Word of Mouth Marketing: How Smart Companies Get People Talking: Book in a Nutshell

Word of Mouth Marketing: How Smart Companies Get People Talking: Book in a Nutshell

I’m renovating my master bath and am amazed by how helpful people I’ve never met are in speeding my decision process. That is, comments and online reviews by other shoppers have persuaded me to choose things and alerted me to issues, such as a tricky cabinet assembly or that an item’s actual color differed from its seller’s description. One helpful soul even posted his renovation pics that gave me an idea of how to combine a company’s products that the company itself didn’t bother to explain. This phenomenon has a name: “Word of Mouth Marketing,” also the title of Andy Sernovitz’s 2012 book. Unfortunately, WOM gets overlooked when marketing is measured because it’s not classified separately as a marketing tool. WOM Is Your Most Important Marketing Tool This “hidden statistic” is actually the largest driver of new sales, Sernovitz says. When you consider where most new customers come from, it’s usually a combination of WOM from friends, coworkers and existing customers. Other sources such as advertising, direct mail and sales lag behind. Only 20 percent of WOM actually occurs online, according to Sernovitz, but I think of it as a chain of events in which people talk both online and offline about what they love or hate. The online piece is a link in this chain that you can strengthen with the tips Sernovitz provides, listed below. What happens online doesn’t determine WOM; it reflects everything else your company does, whether it’s sending a thank you coupon or hanging up on a difficult customer. Make sure it’s a flattering reflection by pleasing customers. Lousy customer service equals lousy WOM....
“To Sell Is Human” by Daniel Pink: Book in a Nutshell

“To Sell Is Human” by Daniel Pink: Book in a Nutshell

When you think of sales, do you think of pejoratives such as pushy, sleazy and dishonest? Most people do. Yet in “To Sell Is Human: The Surprising Truth About Moving Others,” Daniel H. Pink contends that most of us, regardless of job title or salary structure, are salespeople. What? Sales, broadly defined, means moving people to action, which people must do well to be successful. This “non-sales selling” doesn’t involve a purchase—it simply means persuading, influencing and convincing others. Not only does this comprise 41 percent of total work time, according to an international study with 9,057 respondents that Pink paid for, but people say it’s the most productive use of their time. While only one in nine Americans works in sales per se, the other eight are selling others on learning chemistry, on using new media for marketing, or on exercising more. What Pink calls “EdMed”—healthcare and education—has a large sales component. This is the biggest job sector in the U.S., with more workers than manufacturing, retail and professional and business services, and projected to grow the most. Pink, following up bestsellers “A Whole New Mind” and “Drive,” wants to clean up its bad reputation and recast sales not as a way to get the best of others, but to improve the world. As he explains the book’s title, “Moving others doesn’t require that we neglect these nobler aspects [idealism and artistry] of our nature . . . Today it demands that we embrace them.” Pink’s ABCs Of Sales Some of Pink’s advice is supported by conventional wisdom but not all; Pink draws heavily upon sometimes surprising social science research. “Attunement”...
On The Bookshelf: The Zen Of Social Media Marketing By Shama Kabani [Giveaway!]

On The Bookshelf: The Zen Of Social Media Marketing By Shama Kabani [Giveaway!]

{Web.Search.Social} Giveaway: Download a free excerpt of the book and enter to win a free copy at the end of this review. When publishers BenBella Books generously offered two free copies of the new edition of the Zen of Social Media Marketing for the subscribers of {Web.Search.Social} I jumped at the chance and was thrilled when a copy landed on my desk. Here’s my review… and if this book sounds like one that’s for you, download a free excerpt and enter the giveaway at the end. This Book Starts Where It Should: With The Marketing “Social” is just a word we tacked onto “marketing”, but that doesn’t make it any less about marketing. In this book, Shama starts out with some marketing fundamentals, discusses the importance of a good website as a vital component of any social marketing plan, tangents into SEO with some practical tips and then hits hard with “get up off the couch and start working” stuff. I’ll get to that in a minute, but I want to mention first that if you read nothing else in this book… even if you think you know everything about social marketing… I want you to read Chapter 5. And then I want you to read it again. And when you’re done, I want you to rip the pages out and glue them to your office walls because Shama says quite possibly the single most important thing you can understand about social marketing: People do not use social networks to connect. They use them to showcase their own identities. I couldn’t do it justice without reprinting it word for word, but the key...
The Mobile Wave: How Mobile Intelligence Will Transform Everything: Book in a Nutshell

The Mobile Wave: How Mobile Intelligence Will Transform Everything: Book in a Nutshell

“Games, toys, music, books, and even nannies are being transformed into software, and this new device will become the universal container for all of them.” Which device is author Michael J. Saylor referring to? Take a guess. Mobile technology is ubiquitous: Seventy percent of the world has a cellphone and most of these billions of consumers will trade up eventually to “app-phones.” In “The Mobile Wave,” Saylor, CEO of software firm MicroStrategy, describes five “disruptive” computer waves:  Mainframes in the 1940s The minicomputer in 1965 Desktops in 1975 The Internet in 1996 The “mobile wave” The mobile wave represents not just tinier versions of present technology, but an economic game changer. The lithium-ion battery and flash memory made the wave possible by enabling the invention of the smartphone, which in turn transformed cell phones into hand-held computers. Saylor claims that the fusion of mobile computing with social networks will transform half the world’s GDP. And create world peace and end illness. That last part’s not serious, but Saylor’s predictions are sweeping and utopian. If this book is right, we’ll soon be happily retiring our desktop computers, printers, currency, paper, credit cards, bookshelves and file cabinets. First, mobile devices have these advantages over desktop and laptop computers: They are cheaper and turn on instantly. Batteries last longer, improving portability Apps are inexpensive and simple to buy and use GPS provides real-time intelligence about your location A touchscreen, multi-touch interface provides a user experience that’s superior to a mouse and keyboard Businesses will benefit by developing customized apps, eliminating retail, distribution and service functions and giving manufacturers direct access to consumers....
On The Bookshelf (Plus A Giveaway): Networking Is Dead By Melissa G. Wilson And Larry Mohl

On The Bookshelf (Plus A Giveaway): Networking Is Dead By Melissa G. Wilson And Larry Mohl

Do you go to networking events with a pocket full of business cards and hand them out with your elevator pitch in hopes of generating a couple of leads? Do you meet people at trade shows or seminars and hand out a few more, figuring maybe they have a friend of a friend who might be interested in what you offer? And how well does that usually turn out? I don’t know about you, but I have literally hundreds of business cards (all neatly stored in cases and folios) for people I’ve met at Chamber of Commerce events, social gatherings, meetups and any number of “meet-and-greets”. And I’ve never worked with a single one. It’s not that I didn’t need insurance. Or my carpet cleaned. Or a party planned. Or a massage. It’s just that I couldn’t possibly tell you who, in that massive pile of dead trees, is who. If that sounds like you, you may be relieved to hear that networking is dead… at least in the traditional mind-numbing way that we’ve been taught to think about it. You may also be relieved to hear that the new networking is less painful and results in more business. Want to know how it’s done? Then you’ll want to read this book. A Tale Of Two Networkers The intriguing thing about this book is that it’s fiction. Instead of the usual business book that talks at you like a grad school lecture, this one is told as the story of two individuals who want to boost their networking power. One is a bit shy and doesn’t have a lot...
On The Bookshelf: Managing Content Marketing By Robert Rose And Joe Pulizzi

On The Bookshelf: Managing Content Marketing By Robert Rose And Joe Pulizzi

“Content marketing” is all the rage. It’s the new SEO. It’s an old tactic made shiny again by the internet. It’s why you must blog, it’s how to create a community, and like all hot new buzzwords, it’s widely discussed in some of the most excruciatingly shallow detail imaginable. You may have begun to suspect that there’s more to content marketing than just having a blog. And that there’s a way to approach it, plan it, even measure it. But search as you might, you rarely get past advice like “create great content” and “find out what your audience wants”. This is often a big frustration for me because I like to skip quickly past all the high-minded rationales right to the heart of, “Sounds great… now HOW do I do this thing?” I’m a roll-up-your-sleeves kind of person. My two favorite words on the planet (other than “want cake?”) are “action item”. Does that sound a little like you? Are you tired of the same recycled advice about how to do a thing, and stymied when it comes to the actual doing of the thing? If so, join the club… and read this book. The Real Thing I picked this book up the day after I heard Joe Pulizzi’s keynote speech at Social Media Examiner’s “Content Marketing Success Summit”. It was that rare combination of inspiring and practical, and I already had warm fuzzies for Joe since he let us interview him for this blog. So I grabbed the book, got out my highlighter and curled up for the night. I hope neither Robert nor Joe will mind...